Imagine arabesques or various forms of meandering line winding themselves out not on a plane surface but in space, with all that is conveyed to our inner awareness by the deep indeterminate margins of the sky; imagine this interplay of lines carved forward and combined with the most diverse elements, including that of the human face; if that face has particular features of the one which we meet everyday in the street, with its fortuitous, immediate and wholly real truth, you will have the usual combination of a large number of my drawings.

Odilon Redon, Expressionist
"Origins and Development of Kinetic Art", F. Popper, 1968, Studio Vista (via onceinahouseonahill)

Originally from _FROMPAMM • ON A HILL

(via monolithos)

Source: plastolux.com

Originally from remash






In-Camera Photo Manipulations - Using a Mirror : When i encounter things like these, i wish i’d have thought of it sooner, but it’s a beautifully bent perpective that i can’t help but appreciate more than a damn good idea.
Julianne Swartz gives us a surreal look at what holding a piece of nature in one’s hand looks like. While many of the illusionary works in her series titled Placements looks as though the photographer is holding the moon in her hand, she is actually just presenting a circular reflection of water and sky. With a mirror gripped in her palm, Swartz is able to deceptively display two points of view simultaneously. The artist thereby presents a composite image, using in-camera and on-site photo manipulation.
Swartz takes cues from artist Robert Smithson's late 1960s Displacements series, which explored the reflective properties of mirrors, pointing out that “the mirror in a sense is both the physical mirror and the reflection: the mirror as a concept and abstraction; then the mirror as a fact within the mirror of the concept.” So, within any given image of Placements, we’re looking at a number of things—the background scenery, Swartz’s interjecting hand, the mirror as a physical object, the scenery visualized through the mirror’s reflection, and the illusion of that reflected pattern being held in Swartz’s hand as something other than its true form. The series presents a complex, multilayered view of perception. 

In-Camera Photo Manipulations - Using a Mirror : 

When i encounter things like these, i wish i’d have thought of it sooner, but it’s a beautifully bent perpective that i can’t help but appreciate more than a damn good idea.

Julianne Swartz gives us a surreal look at what holding a piece of nature in one’s hand looks like. While many of the illusionary works in her series titled Placements looks as though the photographer is holding the moon in her hand, she is actually just presenting a circular reflection of water and sky. With a mirror gripped in her palm, Swartz is able to deceptively display two points of view simultaneously. The artist thereby presents a composite image, using in-camera and on-site photo manipulation.

Swartz takes cues from artist Robert Smithson's late 1960s Displacements series, which explored the reflective properties of mirrors, pointing out that “the mirror in a sense is both the physical mirror and the reflection: the mirror as a concept and abstraction; then the mirror as a fact within the mirror of the concept.” So, within any given image of Placements, we’re looking at a number of things—the background scenery, Swartz’s interjecting hand, the mirror as a physical object, the scenery visualized through the mirror’s reflection, and the illusion of that reflected pattern being held in Swartz’s hand as something other than its true form. The series presents a complex, multilayered view of perception. 

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Source: mymodernmet.com




Rune Guneriussen’s First US Solo Exhibition of Magical Lights : Magical Fields, Magical Landings. "The process involves the object, story, space and most important the time it is made within. It is an approach to the balance between nature and human culture, and all the sub levels of our own existence."


Rune Guneriussen’s First US Solo Exhibition of Magical Lights : Magical Fields, Magical Landings.

 "The process involves the object, story, space and most important the time it is made within. It is an approach to the balance between nature and human culture, and all the sub levels of our own existence."


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Source: mymodernmet.com

Alumni: Loughborough University Honors List!

Knighthood - Sir Quentin Saxby BLAKE, CBE.  Illustrator.  For services to Illustration.

Known for his work on the BBC animated series as well as illustration for Roald Dahl books we’ve all grown up reading and being entranced by his drawings. His own heavily illustrated and quirky books include Mister Magnolia, Zagazoo and Loveykins.

So proud to be part of Loughborough Uni.’s alumni in this aspect!

> http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-20849907

Alumni: Loughborough University Honors List!

Knighthood - Sir Quentin Saxby BLAKE, CBE.  Illustrator.  For services to Illustration.

Known for his work on the BBC animated series as well as illustration for Roald Dahl books we’ve all grown up reading and being entranced by his drawings. His own heavily illustrated and quirky books include Mister Magnolia, Zagazoo and Loveykins.

So proud to be part of Loughborough Uni.’s alumni in this aspect!

> http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-20849907

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In an exquisite collaboration with couture hat designer Philip Treacy, Moritz Waldemeyer created a collection of kinetic LED hats for the Treacy’s catwalk show at the Royal Courts of Justice. 

Spinning above the model’s head, the kinetic LED lights create a magical halo effect. Another extraordinary piece envelops the model in a net of light, having her presences disappear entire.
(via Kinetic LED Millinery by Philip Treacy & Moritz Waldemeyer)

In an exquisite collaboration with couture hat designer Philip TreacyMoritz Waldemeyer created a collection of kinetic LED hats for the Treacy’s catwalk show at the Royal Courts of Justice. 

Spinning above the model’s head, the kinetic LED lights create a magical halo effect. Another extraordinary piece envelops the model in a net of light, having her presences disappear entire.

(via Kinetic LED Millinery by Philip Treacy & Moritz Waldemeyer)

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Source: fashioningtech.com

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Canadian photographer Joel Robinson has enchanted us in the past with his surreal imagery involving books and teacups wrapped in fairy tale themes. While we’re most used to the imaginative photographer working with homely materials, Robinson also has a recurring appearance of hands in his body of work. In fact, hands are so frequently featured in his images that it has caused him to separate his work into a series titled Put Your Hands Up.
Within the plentiful collection, Robinson has a selection of shots that reveal a darker and somewhat more romantic side to his aesthetic while retaining his signature essence of magic and surrealism. Hands and arms reach into the frame and emerge from the ground with some form of plant or flower extending from the isolated limb’s veins. Through these manipulated displays, the photographer creates a visual connection between the human form and nature, intriguing our senses.
(via Surreal Plants Emerge as Extensions of the Human Arm)

Canadian photographer Joel Robinson has enchanted us in the past with his surreal imagery involving books and teacups wrapped in fairy tale themes. While we’re most used to the imaginative photographer working with homely materials, Robinson also has a recurring appearance of hands in his body of work. In fact, hands are so frequently featured in his images that it has caused him to separate his work into a series titled Put Your Hands Up.

Within the plentiful collection, Robinson has a selection of shots that reveal a darker and somewhat more romantic side to his aesthetic while retaining his signature essence of magic and surrealism. Hands and arms reach into the frame and emerge from the ground with some form of plant or flower extending from the isolated limb’s veins. Through these manipulated displays, the photographer creates a visual connection between the human form and nature, intriguing our senses.

(via Surreal Plants Emerge as Extensions of the Human Arm)

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Source: mymodernmet.com

Located at Swarovski Crystal Worlds, a crystal-themed indoor theme park in Austria, the dome is lined with 595 mirrors that give visitors the feeling that they’ve stepped inside a crystal. The multi-faceted walls not only refract light, that shines in various colors, they also gradually reveal hidden works of art.
As Swarovski states, “The Crystal Dome is a kaleidoscopic, precision-cut journey into the heart of crystal – right in the middle of the homeland of crystal itself.” Looks like something out of a dream.
(via Stepping Inside a Sparkling Crystal - My Modern Metropolis)

Located at Swarovski Crystal Worlds, a crystal-themed indoor theme park in Austria, the dome is lined with 595 mirrors that give visitors the feeling that they’ve stepped inside a crystal. The multi-faceted walls not only refract light, that shines in various colors, they also gradually reveal hidden works of art.

As Swarovski states, “The Crystal Dome is a kaleidoscopic, precision-cut journey into the heart of crystal – right in the middle of the homeland of crystal itself.” Looks like something out of a dream.

(via Stepping Inside a Sparkling Crystal - My Modern Metropolis)

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Source: mymodernmet.com

Most of what makes a book ‘good’ is that we are reading it at the right moment for us.

 Alain de Botton (via spacecakeofawesome)

Originally from AARONISMS